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20100901
20100930
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)
's what we do. >> ifill: and margaret warner speaks to two analysts about north korea's latest succession drama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: on the surface, today's housing news looked pretty good. it came from a closely watched report on property values known as the case-shiller index. the survey found home prices rose in july for the fourth straight month. in all, a dozen cities out of 20 reported gains, while seven were down. one was unchanged. but that was partly because home sales were boosted by a federal tax credit that has since expired. president obama addressed the housing issue today. speaking in albuquerque, new mexico, he urged potential buyers to be prudent. >> if you want a house, you have to save for a while. you have to wait until you have 20% down. you should go for a mortgage that you know you can afford. you've got... there shouldn't
talks in washington. >> woodruff: margaret warner reports from baghdad on the continued stalemate in forming a government, some five months after parliamentary elections. some of the political players may decide to use violence themselves as a pressure point. >> lehrer: newshour correspondent spencer michels examines the impact of u.s. supreme court rulings on local gun regulations in california. >> among the first results of the supreme court decisions on guns: gun shows like this may become more common in california. >> woodruff: plus an encore look at jeffrey brown's profile of tap dance great maurice hines passing the torch and tradition to a new generation. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the east coast kept a weather eye on the sea today, waiting for the arrival of hur
's middle east peace talks: margaret warner on the political stalemate in iraq: questions about gun rights in california: and a tap dancing tradition, alive and well. but first to hari in our newsroom. >> sreenivasan: coast guard cutters and aircraft scrambled today after the latest oil fire in the gulf. they picked up all 13 workers who were on the mariner energy platform that exploded and burned. it happened in shallow water 80 miles south of vermilion bay in louisiana and about 200 miles west of where the b.p. oil spill took place. for more, i'm joined now by david ham we are the "times-picayune" in new orleans. what's the latest we have now? >> well, as you said, all of the 13 people on board have been brought in to the regional medical center. seems like all they had was sun burn issues, nothing major. and we've had conflicting reports earlier in the day about oil sheen seen on the water, but the latest from the coast guard is that there is no sheen visible at this time and it seems like there's... people are on edge a lot because of the proximity to the b.p. spill four months ago. bu
in seven americans lived in poverty and 50.7 million were uninsured last year. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, ray suarez walks economists isabel sawhill and harry holzer through these record breaking numbers and assess the impact the recession has had on the poor. >> lehrer: then, "atlantic" magazine reporter jeffrey goldberg and latin america analyst julia sweig talk about their recent conversations with fidel castro. >> warner: betty ann bowser reports from new orleans on an effort to establish clinics for people who lost health care after hurricane katrina wiped out the city's charity hospital. >> the storm, the flooding was horrific but it really was an opportunity for us to try something new and better for our patients. >> lehrer: gwen ifill has a conversation with online editor and liberal commentator arianna huffington on her new book about the declining middle class. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks with composer and musician herbie hancock, whose 70th birthday tour fuses jazz with global beats. >> taking what happens and trying to make it work. th
future. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks to margaret warner about president obama's visit to the united nations and the reaction there to his diplomatic initiatives. >> brown: special correspondent dave iverson reports on a new push to get scientists to work together in the pursuit of medical cures. >> let's put our arms together and brains together and solve the problem collectively and for a project like this you absolutely need that to succeed. >> woodruff: and isabel wilkerson discusses her new book on the great migration of african americans. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the future. >> i want to design... >> a better solar cell. >> i want to know what's really possible. >> i want to be the first to cure cancer. >> people don't really understand why things work. >> i want to be that person that finds out why. >> inn
and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was
: the leaders move to jerusalem for more discussions wednesday. this morning, margaret warner spoke with former british prime minister tony blair, who represents the middle east quartet of the u.n., the u.s., the european union and russia. they met in new york, where blair is promoting his political memoir, "a journey." >> warner: tony blair, thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure, margaret, thank you. >> warner: i want to talk about your book which is going to debut on number three on the "new york times" best seller list this sunday. first the news of the day. the middle east peace talks resuming. after these years of false starts and dashed expectations do you think these talks have any better chance of succeeding? >> yes, i do, in fact. and sometimes what happens in these processes, as with northern ireland, is that you can struggle for decades, not quite achieving it. and then it can come together. i think the reason it can come together here in the middle east is because we have a opportunity frankly with a region that is more concerned about iran really , that wants to take this poison
an election season look at campaign cash-- who's giving, and why. >> ifill: margaret warner examines the impact international sanctions are having on iranians. >> they're having a dramatic impact. i think that the u.n. security council resolution was underestimated. it was underestimated by iran and it was undersfimented by lots of people in the international community. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: today's vote in the u.s. senate means the ban on gays in the military will stand, at least for now. opponents of the ban fell four votes short today in their bid to break a filibuster. >> the vote was about whether to begin debating a military budget bill. it includeded language calling for repeal of don't ask don't tell. but the republican filibuster held and the measure stayed s
: margaret warner runs a debate on whether the f.d.a. should allow the sale of genetically modified salmon for human consumption. >> ifill: judy woodruff looks at the political power of sarah palin, with reporters libby casey of alaska public radio and jeff zeleny of the "new york times." anybody spots new tennis shoes the headline is going to be, vanity fair, they're going to say palin in iowa decides to run. >> brown: and ray suarez talks with angela kocherga of belo television on the latest killing of a journalist in the mexican drug wars. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the low, slow vote count was under way in afghanistan today as the country selected a new parliament. saturday's election was marked by uneven turnout, taliban attacks, and widespread claims >> there may be no bette
. >> brown: margaret warner gets the details on the merger between low-cost rivals southwest airlines and air tran. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the future of middle east peace talks was up in the air again today, as negotiators waited to see if settlement construction would begin again on the west bank, and palestinians would walk away from the table. >> for the first time today in nearly a year there was nothing to stop jewish settlers from building homes in the west bank. but for the most part all remain quiet. at a small settlement in the southern west bank, a long bulldozer plowed fresh earth but that construction had been approved before the building moratorium went into effect last november. on saturday at the united nations, palestinian president macmoud abbas who had lobbied f
of government help. >> ifill: and margaret warner speaks to veteran journalist earl caldwell about famed civil rights era photographer and newly revealed fbi informant ernest withers. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the future. >> i want to design... >> a better solar cell. >> i want to know what's really possible. >> i want to be the first to cure cancer. >> people don't really understand why things work. >> i want to be that person that finds out why. >> innovative young minds taking on tomorrow's toughest challenges. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like y
to have also done double duty for the fbi. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: a free-lance photographer for the black press in the 1950s and '60s, ernest withers chronicled landmark moments in the battle for civil rights. he covered the 1955 murder of emmett till, the bus boycotts, and protests like the 1968 sanitation workers strike in memphis. he was treated like an insider, and given intimate access to movement leaders like dr. martin luther king. but this week, the memphis commercial appeal reported that withers also worked as an fbi informant most probably paid from at least 1968 to 1970. for more, we turn to earl caldwell. he reported on the civil rights struggle for the "new york times" and knew withers. he's now a professor at hampton university's scripps howard school of journalism. mr. caldwell, welcome. give us first a sense of ernest withers, and how important his work was to this country's understanding of the civil rights movement. >> his work was hugely important because he brought back the pictures. , you know, you can have a thousand words, but it's t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)